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There’s no shortage of things different about writing a comic compared to writing a novel. Heaps of them. One is that Wednesday suddenly becomes the most important day of the week. Comics fans already know this, of course. For everyone else, I should perhaps explain that Wednesday is … New Comics Day!

Yes, by ancient and noble tradition, comics show up in shops and online in highly regimented fashion, every Wednesday. This particular Wednesday is the one on which my first attempt at writing a comic reaches places the public can get it. Rogue Trooper #1 has been released into the wild.

Available now (today!) in your local comic shop, online at Comixology and probably elsewhere in the digital universe (but when I buy digital comics, I get them from comixology, so to be honest I don’t really know how it works elsewhere).

I may only be a novice at this comics writing thing but Alberto Ponticelli and Steve Downer, the artist and colourist, know exactly what they’re doing in this medium, and they’ve created a very good-looking book imho. Can’t beat having experienced collaborators to keep you afloat as you learn to swim.

You’d be doing me a solid (is that what the kids say nowadays? Or was that years ago?) if you gave Rogue Trooper #1 a try …

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A good while back, I did a post here pontificating about how the question ‘Where do you get your ideas from?’ was not a particularly good query to fire at a writer.

This is the sequel to that post, in which I answer the question in question. Just thought it’d be fun. Might also help to illustrate my case that ideas are the easy bit, coming as they do from everywhere, all the time, unpredictably.

So, here’s where the idea for every piece of fiction I’ve sold came from, in chronological order of publication.

Farm Animal, my first published story, appeared in the UK’s venerable sf magazine Interzone a long, long time ago. It has a unique, and unusually simple, origin in the context of my fiction output: it’s loosely based on a dream I had. It was a kind of creepy, not very nice, dream so we won’t go into any more details except to say it involved a human-pig hybrid. The hard bit, as ever, was turning that seed into a narrative of some sort, and in the process the story became about the transformation of a human into a pig. (Sidenote: I remember being quite pleased with myself, at that presumptuous age, for coming up with a title that reverses Animal Farm, in which pigs transform into humans, just as my story reverses that transformation. Doesn’t seem quite so clever now.)

Gibbons, my second published story, appeared in another UK magazine: The Third Alternative – still going, under the new title Black Static. Its origin is also unique in this list, in that it comes from my own direct, personal experience. In my early twenties I spent three months in Borneo, finding, following and sound-recording gibbons in a remote part of the rainforest. In hindsight, as you might expect, it was a powerful, rather formative experience in various ways (including career-wise, since it would later result in me getting a job that sent me to many other unusual, out of the way bits of the world), though at the time – as with many such experiences – I didn’t fully appreciate its significance. What did imprint itself on my mind even then, though, was the potent atmosphere and character of the place. It took years for the story that gave voice to my impressions of the Bornean rainforest to take shape, but Gibbons was the eventual result.

Winterbirth, and the Godless World trilogy of which it is the first part, has a messy kind of idea-origin. I knew I wanted to try writing novels, and I was instinctively interested in the possibility of a fantasy trilogy. I needed an imaginative nudge of some sort to get the process of world, character and story development going, and it came from the TV, in a way. This was way back when the Balkans, and the former Yugoslavia in particular, were in post-Communist meltdown and filling our TV screens and newspapers with stories and images of horrendous and cruel violence. Because I was even then a history nerd, I knew a lot of what was happening was the indirect fruit of bitter rivalries, enmities and events that went back many, many hundreds of years, and I was struck by the thought that it might be interesting to write about a fantasy world similarly torn apart by long-suppressed, half-hidden enmities that were somehow allowed to re-emerge.

Now, that initial idea got considerably complicated and diluted by the aforementioned process of world, character and story development. It provided the impetus for the process, but was itself changed and elaborated by it. Such things happen, once you get into the flow of turning a small spark into a fully fledged fire. But that’s what ideas are for really: they start the process, but unlike a chemical catalyst, they don’t have to survive that process unchanged.

Beyond the Reach of His Gods is a short story that appeared in the anthology Rage of the Behemoth, from Rogue Blades Entertainment. Much to my delight, it’s since been reprinted in the excellent online magazine Lightspeed, so you can read the whole thing for free over there if you like. This was the first time I’d been invited/commissioned to write a story for an anthology, and the brief was highly specific: heroic fantasy involving a giant monster set in one of several specific environments. I had no pre-existing ideas that fitted the bill (hardly surprising!), so the idea for this story had to be kind of ‘forced’. Except it came to me very easily, very quickly and very completely. I’ve no idea how that happens, but now and again it does: I just looked at the brief, thought about it for a bit, and the setting, characters, monster and the basic skeleton of the plot just turned up in my head. Very nice, and forunate really, since I would probably have turned down the invitation had things not bubbled up so easily, and had the story they suggested not struck me as being fun to write.

Flint was another short story for an anthology – Speculative Horizons, from Subterranean Press, edited by Patrick St-Denis. Again, I was asked if I would contribute, but this time there were no prescriptions regarding subject matter or even specific genre. So I pulled out a partially developed idea I’d been keeping on a mental shelf for ages, and used this as the opportunity to turn it into an actual story. That idea had its roots in my non-fiction reading: books like The Golden Bough, After The Ice and Shamanism. In learning and thinking about early magical beliefs, hunter-gatherer societies and the deep, deep past of human society and imagination, it struck me that a Stone-Age shaman would make an interesting central character for some kind of story. I knew very early on that his name would be Flint, but much of the detail of his adventures only got filled in when Patrick asked me if I fancied writing a story for his anthology …

The Edinburgh Dead has a very clear and fairly simple idea-origin. Having grown up in Edinburgh, and living there again now after a good few years away, I know a lot about its history and geography. Mind you, even people who’ve never been here have heard of Burke & Hare, the infamous baddies who murdered a lot of people so that they could sell their corpses to lecturers for dissection in anatomy classes in the early 19th century. For whatever reason, one day while musing on Edinburgh’s rich and complicated history, I just asked myself: ‘What if there were other people around back then, who wanted corpses for a different kind of experiment?’. From that question, after a good deal of research and the addition of a good many other influences, the whole novel emerged. And, inevitably, Burke and Hare stayed in the mix as characters in the story.

Rogue Trooper, the comic I’m writing for IDW (first issue in comic shops and on Comixology on Feb 26th!), is a different kettle of fish, idea-wise. This is a pre-existing character and milieu that I was asked to re-imagine. So the ideas required are of a different kind: what games can I play, what details can I add or subtract, what themes can I develop, with this already-established character? Those kind of ideas just come from looking at what’s there already, thinking back or re-visiting all the previous Rogue Trooper stories I read as a youth, applying my personal instincts as a writer to the property. To be honest, lots and lots of possibilities presented themselves to me as soon as I became aware of the opportunity, so it wasn’t too difficult. When someone else has done the hard work of creating a strong character, setting and framework, riffing on it is pretty straightforward (at least in terms of ideas, if not execution; believe me, I can now say from personal experience that writing comics is not straightforward or effortless!).

The Free will be published this October by Orbit, and it’s kind of fitting that it comes last on this list because in one sense it’s an extreme example on the original idea front. This book, alone of all the fictions on this list, has shed its originating idea like a snake shedding a skin. Literally no trace of the idea to which it can trace its roots remains in the novel that will be published. Weird, huh? Anyway, one day – or night, I think perhaps I was trying to go to sleep – a scene just popped into my head. In an underground cavern, someone discovers a prisoner, trapped in a huge cage. That was it. This was way back when I was still writing the Godless World trilogy. I had half a notion I might try writing another trilogy after I was finished with that one (a notion I soon thought better of!), and that single, unformed scene became the seed from which I gradually grew the outline of a whole plot, world, magic system, characters – I didn’t have a full trilogy worked out in detail, but I had a lot of stuff churning around in my head.

Except, I wrote The Edinburgh Dead instead. But the story-stuff that had sprung from that single imagined scene kept stewing in my thinking parts, and kept changing. In the plot I’d loosely imagined, there were a set of secondary characters – mercenaries – who struck me as interesting. To cut a long story short, I ended up pitching an idea focused upon them to the publisher as a stand-alone novel. The Free. The world in which they operate is not the one I dreamed up for that trilogy; the magic system is utterly different; there’s not a single character who has survived from my earlier musings into the text of the The Free; at no point does anyone even go underground, let alone discover a subterranean chamber with a caged prisoner in it. (But who’s to say what might happen, should I ever write any more stories about The Free?)

So there you are. I get my ideas from dreams, from personal experiences, from current affairs, from history, from commissions, from non-fiction books, from other people’s creations, from random scenes popping into my head. And I could add, in respect of fictions I’ve thought about or am currently pondering, which may or may not ever see the light of day: I also get them from idle reflections on the under-use of particular mythical creatures in fiction, consciously setting myself the challenge of coming up with an idea for a TV/radio series, writing tasks based on a single word set by tutors on a short course I did many years ago, looking at maps, etc. etc.

All seems clear enough. Question answered.

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I’ve brought the curtain down on my Words & Pictures column over at SF Signal, where I’ve been talking about comics I like – on a slightly irregular schedule – for close to two years now.  (Two years!  That thing they say about time flying isn’t just a thing they say).

So anyway, that particular adventure is done for now.  Might resurrect it one day, but for now it’s in semi-permanent retirement.  The full collection of my comics-related ramblings over those two years is right here, including a final column on the subject of Conan. And if anyone isn’t already keeping track of the whole SF Signal site, I’d highly recommend doing so.  Not just because they were kind enough to give me a platform, but because there’s something there for pretty much anyone who likes sf, fantasy, horror.

And as that comics-related thing draws to a close, I’m gearing up for the next: writing a Rogue Trooper comic for IDW.  The series launches early next year, but there’s already a lengthy and detailed interview with me up at the excellent Forbidden Planet International blog.  Go there if you’re curious about what I’m doing, how and why.  It may not have all the answers, but it’s got quite a few (plus some truly gorgeous covers by some very fine artists, which are going to be adorning my first issue).

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This news is out there on the interwebs today, so I guess I can go public with it.

‘Tis true: I’m diversifying a bit, and writing a Rogue Trooper comic for the excellent folks over at IDW.

As visitors here may have noticed, I’m a fairly major comics fan. Unsurprisingly, I’m therefore pretty excited to be dipping my toes in those creative waters, especially since it’s on a character I knew well in my youth. As a British kid who liked comics and SF, it goes without saying that 2000 AD was a biiiig deal to me way back then, and Rogue Trooper was one of my favourite strips. It’s remained one of those I remember with the most affection, along with stuff like Dredd, Slaine and Nemesis. So all in all, fair to say I’m a happy chap with this turn of events.

Lovely cover art for #1, don’t you think?, by Glenn Fabry and Ryan Brown:

I’m lucky enough to be serving the interior art of Alberto Ponticelli with my scripts, so I think the whole package is going to look kind of nice, to put it mildly. More info to follow soon, of course. I believe the first issue will be in a comic shop near you in February 2014 or thereabouts.

And in case anyone’s wondering, none of this affects The Free. The hard work on that is largely done I think, the lovely powers-that-be at Orbit are making positive noises and as far as I know it remains on its intended publication course. So with any luck I’ll have both a novel and comics on shelves in 2014. Should be a fun year.

For those who wonder how these things come about … well, I expect the story’ll get told at some point (it’s not wildly exciting or surprising, before you get your expectations up too high), but for now let’s just say it convinced me even more that what I said in this post about luck was on the money. You can’t control exactly when or how you get lucky, but you can at the very least give it the chance to show up in your life. I did, and it did. Sweet.

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